The Sun At Midnight
Still locked out but in a different way
..

Still locked out but in a different way
..

The First True Colored Doll

The First True Colored Doll

The Great American Past-time 

The Great American Past-time 

Osho

Osho

Colonialism and Homosexuality is a thorough investigation of the connections of homosexuality and imperialism from the late 1800s - the era of ‘new imperialism’ - until the era of decolonization. Robert Aldrich reconstructs the context of a number of liaisons, including those of famous men such as Cecil Rhodes, E.M. Forster or André Gide, and the historical situations which produced both the Europeans and their non-Western lovers.
Colonial lands, which in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century included most of Africa, South and Southeast Asia and the islands of the Pacific and Indian Oceans and the Caribbean, provided a haven for many Europeans whose sexual inclinations did not fit neatly into the constraints of European society.

Colonialism and Homosexuality is a thorough investigation of the connections of homosexuality and imperialism from the late 1800s - the era of ‘new imperialism’ - until the era of decolonization. Robert Aldrich reconstructs the context of a number of liaisons, including those of famous men such as Cecil Rhodes, E.M. Forster or André Gide, and the historical situations which produced both the Europeans and their non-Western lovers.

Colonial lands, which in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century included most of Africa, South and Southeast Asia and the islands of the Pacific and Indian Oceans and the Caribbean, provided a haven for many Europeans whose sexual inclinations did not fit neatly into the constraints of European society.

"Colonial Desire" shows how culture has always carried within it an inner dissonance, and "Englishness" has always been less fixed and stable than uncertain, fissured by difference and a longing for otherness. At the heart of Victorian racial theory, this re-emerges in the form of colonial desire: an obsession with hybridity, and transgressive fantasies of inter-racial sex. "Colonial Desire" is a controversial study that breaks new ground in analysing how concepts of culture get formed, and how racialized assumptions continue to pervade the

"Colonial Desire" shows how culture has always carried within it an inner dissonance, and "Englishness" has always been less fixed and stable than uncertain, fissured by difference and a longing for otherness. At the heart of Victorian racial theory, this re-emerges in the form of colonial desire: an obsession with hybridity, and transgressive fantasies of inter-racial sex. "Colonial Desire" is a controversial study that breaks new ground in analysing how concepts of culture get formed, and how racialized assumptions continue to pervade the

In a new article published this month in the American Historical Review, Carina Ray explores the connections between racialized sexual exploitation and anti-colonial nationalism.

While sifting through tattered copies of The Gold Coaster Leader, colonial Ghana’s most politically radical early twentieth-century African-owned newspaper, Ray stumbled upon a column provocatively titled “Immoral Sanitation.” The short article packed quite a punch. In it, white men were accused of sexually exploiting the colony’s young women and threatening the moral fabric of African society. With the help of Rachel Welsh, who recently completed her MA in History at Fordham, Ray undertook a comprehensive survey of the Leader’s thirty year print run and soon discovered that the column was one of many commentaries that appeared in the newspaper during 1919 and 1920 that challenged conventional colonial thinking about the locus of sexual threat in the colonies. At a moment when press reports in diverse corners of the globe were rife with tales about the alleged sexual threat black men posed to white women, the proverbial Black Peril, Gold Coast writers turned this tale on its head by asserting that white men were the real sexual menace.
In “Decrying White Peril: Interracial Sex and the Rise of Anticolonial Nationalism in the Gold Coast” Ray argues that racialized sexual exploitation was more than a quotidian reality of colonialism and other regimes of racial oppression, it was also a constitutive part of the political movements that brought these regimes to an end.


Carina Ray speaks about the reception of US power in Africa at History Day 2013

Currently, Ray is  teaching a course entitled”Assassination: a History of Post-Independence Africa” and “Race, Sex, and Colonialism.” This summer, she will be teaching a summer course in London entitled “Archiving Africa” (the course is now enrolling, and more information on joining the course is available here). Next year, she will be offering two UHC courses “Africa and the Black Atlantic” as well as the elective “20th Century African Icons” and the service learning course “The African City.”
http://ahr.oxfordjournals.org/content/119/1/78.full.pdf?keytype=ref&ijkey=Ng316ubsDHJjY0w

In a new article published this month in the American Historical Review, Carina Ray explores the connections between racialized sexual exploitation and anti-colonial nationalism.

While sifting through tattered copies of The Gold Coaster Leader, colonial Ghana’s most politically radical early twentieth-century African-owned newspaper, Ray stumbled upon a column provocatively titled “Immoral Sanitation.” The short article packed quite a punch. In it, white men were accused of sexually exploiting the colony’s young women and threatening the moral fabric of African society. With the help of Rachel Welsh, who recently completed her MA in History at Fordham, Ray undertook a comprehensive survey of the Leader’s thirty year print run and soon discovered that the column was one of many commentaries that appeared in the newspaper during 1919 and 1920 that challenged conventional colonial thinking about the locus of sexual threat in the colonies. At a moment when press reports in diverse corners of the globe were rife with tales about the alleged sexual threat black men posed to white women, the proverbial Black Peril, Gold Coast writers turned this tale on its head by asserting that white men were the real sexual menace.
In “Decrying White Peril: Interracial Sex and the Rise of Anticolonial Nationalism in the Gold Coast” Ray argues that racialized sexual exploitation was more than a quotidian reality of colonialism and other regimes of racial oppression, it was also a constitutive part of the political movements that brought these regimes to an end.
Carina Ray speaks about the reception of US power in Africa at History Day 2013

Carina Ray speaks about the reception of US power in Africa at History Day 2013

Currently, Ray is  teaching a course entitled”Assassination: a History of Post-Independence Africa” and “Race, Sex, and Colonialism.” This summer, she will be teaching a summer course in London entitled “Archiving Africa” (the course is now enrolling, and more information on joining the course is available here). Next year, she will be offering two UHC courses “Africa and the Black Atlantic” as well as the elective “20th Century African Icons” and the service learning course “The African City.”

http://ahr.oxfordjournals.org/content/119/1/78.full.pdf?keytype=ref&ijkey=Ng316ubsDHJjY0w